A Modern Woman on the Move

in hot pursuit of the great green light…

Posts Tagged ‘IPRC

AmaZine Day!

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Thanks to everyone who came out to AmaZine Day yesterday, it was so wonderful and fun! I am so glad to be helping organize another, more frequent zine fest here in Portland, I am so thankful for the Independent Publishing Resource Center and its new, bigger space so that the Portland Zine Symposium organizers could organize something like this. We had all the tables full and people in and out, including just random foot-traffic. It was so great to have the first one go so well. Justin, the director at the IPRC, took some video that we should have up soon, plus a lot of pictures various people took.

I had the PZS Pedalpalooza Zine Bike Ride and the PZS Bike-In Movie (we showed The Goonies this year, had our biggest turn out ever), another big event that had nothing to do with zines that I was helping organize on Friday, and AmaZine Day yesterday. I am glad the only thing I have got going on today is teaching comics/zines drop-in class for kids at the IPRC and a coffee date. I am tired.

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Written by lovemotionstory

June 24, 2012 at 11:26 am

IPRC’s new Kickstarter + SU Science and Sci-Fi Submissions Call

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First, I want to thank anyone and everyone who followed the links from my last blog post to help fund  Sparkplug’s IndieGoGo campaignA.M.’s Kickstarter for Tiny Bones: A Memoir with a Wide Margin, or  The Portland Button Works IndieGoGo campaignAll three of those projects got fully funded and beyond! 

If you are still able to give or if you missed out on helping with those awesome projects, please consider donating to the IPRC’s latest Kickstarter to help fund the installation of a glass-paneled garage door, outdoor benches and exterior signage; to finish building the new screenprinting studio and classroom; to purchase much-needed new lab computers, new letterpress machines, screenprinting supplies, library supplies and other art/publishing equipment; and to cover general operating expenses (utilities, rent, staff pay, etc) during this transitional period.

$6,000 is the minimum the Independent Publishing Resource Center needs to raise via kickstarter; the IPRC is actually hoping to raise more than $12,000 in this campaign. Every Kickstarter donation is an investment in the IPRC’s promising new future–and also in your own creative future, especially since all contributions above $25 score you an IPRC membership/renewal. To sweeten the deal, the first $500 in donations will be matched by a generous individual donor.

So, if you need a new IPRC membership anytime soon, I would strongly encourage you to do it through the Kickstarter, but there is a myriad of rewards for contributing to the IPRC’s new Kickstarter campaign.

Speaking of the IPRC’s needs, I wanted to begin to talk about the volunteer need at the new space. Currently, the IPRC only has one volunteer on staff to help out visitors and members, as well as keeping up on maintenance tasks around the center. For the new, large space, the IPRC is looking to double its volunteer base, having two volunteers on staff during open hours. If you’re interested in getting more involved, I can tell you, it’s quite the experience. I have definitely learned so much helping at the IPRC…

Jon Washington and I are actually working on a series of video interviews to help foster enthusiasm for volunteering and spread the word that the IPRC needs more volunteers! So, be on the lookout for that video of IPRC volunteer interviews, coming soon!

In other zine news, have you seen the latest submissions call for Stumptown Underground?

Yep, our next theme is Science and Sci-Fi! The deadline is May 23rd and I can’t wait to see what you awesome people come up with. I am trying to see if we can have our release party at OMSI

Written by lovemotionstory

April 30, 2012 at 3:27 pm

IPRC Zine Machine – Submissions Call and Layout Guides!

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Well, I breifly mentioned this project in my post about The new, bigger IPRC, but here are finally the full details!

Introducing the IPRC‘s wonderful, new Zine Machine! 

Justin Hocking, the Independent Publishing Resource Center‘s Executive Director, picked up this old machine at a local hardware store five years ago… It had a few hiccups, but, with the help of a friend, Justin has gotten this thing running smoothly and it’s just been sitting in his garage waiting for the IPRC to have enough space to house it!

Well, not only do we have enough space in the new IPRC location, we also have a wide open sidewalk with a surprising amount of foot traffic…. We plan to wheel this awesome machine out to the sidewalk while we’re open so that IPRC visitors and neighborhood pedestrians alike can plug in their quarters and pick up a fresh mini zine for just one dollar! 

So now, we just need some great mini zines to stock this ol’ machine! We’re doing an open call for submissions to the Zine Machine. The machine has eleven slots for eleven different zines at any given time and we plan to rotate the selection. If your submitted zine makes it in, the IPRC will print 50 copies of  your zine and box, 25 to be stocked into the machine and 25 for you to give to your friends, sell at Portland Zine Symposium, or whatever!

There are also four spaces to feature four boxes, so part of submitting your mini zine can also be making an eye-catching design for the outside of the box. In fact, you can start on this handy-dandy template I’ve made for the IPRC’s Zine Machine Boxes!

Click on the image to see the full size….

But that’s not all the help we’re giving you!

I did some of the math for you already on what kind of a zine might fit into a box like this and also created a layout guide.

This layout guide is for a single-sheet, mini zine that is 32 pages. A zine with pages this size will definitely fit into your awesomely designed box!

This template prints out on a 8.5″ by 11″ (or letter-sized) paper and is just one idea for a layout for a mini zine layout to fit into a box for the IPRC Zine Machine.

I spent way too much time making these guides, just for the record, but I had a ton of fun doing it and I felt it was important to make sure you feel empowered to create, make, and submit your mini zine! Keep this in mind and please feel free to email me with any questions on creation and submitting. Submissions can be emailed to me at lovemotionstory  at gmail dot com or dropped off at the IPRC for me, 1001 SE Division St. Portland, OR.

I am planning on making a couple more layout guides for mini zines over the next couple weeks, but I would encourage you to play around with a sheet of paper and dream up any new layouts!

There is no deadline for your mini zine submissions, as the Zine Machine will be an ongoing project with a rotating stock.  Personally, I would recommend submitting ASAP so that your zine can be one of the first we have in stock! Also, I would love to see the at least one new zine in there a month! In addition to your zine going into your box, a little zine about the IPRC will be in there too, so that others may learn of the wonders of the IPRC.

Also, if you come across any other old cigarette vending machines or any other old vending machines for cheap or free, the IPRC would love to have them! We could repurpose all kinds of machines, from old candy vending machines to tampon vending machines! We’re hoping to approach local businesses to host more Zine Machines all around Portland.

Written by lovemotionstory

April 24, 2012 at 4:28 pm

The new, bigger IPRC…

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I volunteer to be on staff every Monday at the Independent Publishing Resource Center. If you ever have stopped by on a Monday anytime the last little while, I have probably given you a tour, tried to explain something about InDesign to you, helped you figure out why the copy machine wasn’t printing your zine as you imagine, or whatever. The IPRC has been looking for a bigger location for quite awhile, but a much bigger and interesting place was finally found last year and we spent most March and the beginning of April begging the big move across the river.

That’s me, volunteering real hard, followed by Michael, of Perfect Day Publishing, who also volunteers real hard on Mondays.

I came in last week to help try to unpack, build shelves, clean, setup supplies, shelve zines, etc. The IPRC had a soft opening last week, and things are looking good over here. For so long, we’ve had so many more zines for the zine library than we had shelves. In the new space, we have new new shelves up that are empty! With room in the library to expand, to add even more shelf space! I am excited to watch our backlog of donated zines slowly fill up the library… Our gigantic library (which anyone can borrow from for free, by the way), is fully searchable! Check out the online catalog of all the IPRC’s zines here.

We also have more room in the letterpress area (which allows us to carry new typefaces that were donated to our collection!), we’re are adding a screenprinting studio to our repertoire of available DIY experiences, we have more room for workshops and the certificates programs, and A LOT more…

Today marks my first regular Monday volunteering in our brand new space and, after feeling so inspired helping out last week, I came in early to snap some photos to help give you an idea of how wonderful the new space is and how much the IPRC is really being able to add and incorporate…

Definitely check this machine out which, has been just sitting in Justin’s garage for almost five years, just waiting for us to have more space and to be turned into a Zine Machine!

I am going to be helping IPRC solicit submissions for mini zines to into this wonderful thing and curating it’s selection, but more on that later…

Also, the cheery on the top of the new IPRC’s location, the rooftop! Check out my new favorite place to get elevated.

So, yeah, that’s just a quick update sharing the new IPRC! In case you were too lazy to click the links to the IPRC’s website, the new location is at 1001 SE Division St. #2… Which is kind of rad for a vegan lady like me, because Los Gorditos and Portobello are not even two blocks away!

And, speaking of cool non profits, ADX is also in the neighborhood. Is close-in, SE Portland the new DIY district? Could be…

Life Eternal

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So, as several of you know, either because I emailed you or talked to you in person or because you saw my last blog post, I am working on a zine in remembrance of and in dedication to Dylan Williams.

At this point, after talking to Emily regarding how to handle distributing the zine (if it should be free, if it should be sold by Sparkplug to help keep it going, etc), I approached Justin at the IPRC about selling this zine to help raise funds for a scholarship that IPRC is just announcing will be offered in Dylan’s memory for the IPRC’s Comics Certificate Program. Dylan taught in the program, teaching and supporting others in their creative endeavors was important to him in many ways, and it seems like the best thing to do with the result of the zine… Especially since Emily suggested it. So, this zine will be sold all over and all proceeds will go to the Dylan Williams Scholarship Fund for the IPRC’s Comics Certificate Program.

I am also thinking of calling the zine Life Eternal, because my favorite photo of Dylan is the one Theo posted of Dylan next to those words. I think Dylan would feel kind of awkward if his face was on the cover of something, as he was rather humble, so I was having the cover all black, those letters in white, and that photo on the inside cover with an explanation of the zine, how it’s in dedication to his life and ideas and what the sales of the zine go to. This is not an idea I am married to and I need to ask Theo about using the photo, but it’s the first idea I had. I would also be open to doing a call for an illustration for the cover.

As far as submissions go, anyone can submit anything related to Dylan Williams, his ideas, his life, and so on. I would like to keep guidelines very loose so as to have the zine be  as inclusive as it can. Writing, illustrations, comics… Pretty much anything printable.

Do you have any thoughts on any of this? To what degree would you like to help? Just contributing? Helping review submissions? Organizing? Just organizing advice? I am open to as little or much involvement from anyone at this point, because I’d like to approach it with an inclusive and cooperative spirit. The zine anthology I work on usually, Stumptown Underground, is a collective I started to publish anthologies where all organizers have equal input and submissions are totally open to anyone, so I guess that’s why I would approach this that way.

Please email me regarding any of this or to contribute.
lovemotionstory [at] gmail [dot] com

Thank you, Dylan Williams.

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There aren’t words to express how much Dylan Williams meant to me, yet I have trying to find them since I heard the news of his passing on Saturday.

As a friend, Dylan was kind and honest. He was able to say the things that I would offer to friends but had trouble remembering for myself, the things I needed to hear in a way that I actually heard them. There are so many examples I could give about this throughout our friendship, I can hardly figure out where to start. Instead, I will say that I always took his words and advice to heart and his support and encouragement changed my life. When Dylan confided in me about a couple situations with his friends asking what I thought, I felt like I had one a special prize of maturity, since I so deeply looked up to him.

There was so much I turned to him for, that we commiserated about, that we laughed about, that we worked on… He was vegan, he published, he taught, he created, he organized, he had similar parental issues as I did, he got mad about the same things I get frustrated over (but acted WAY more diplomatically about it). Often, the times when I was confiding in him were when I was trying to reel in my confrontational nature or to channel it more constructively. Conversely, often the times when he confided in me was to determine a way to be more confrontational or direct with someone about something. I laugh and cry just thinking about all of it.


As I search for photos of us together, I see countless emails between us over the years and it breaks my heart that I will never have a chance to work on anything with him again. I wish that I could call him and ask him what he thinks the best way to deal with any of this is right now. If you want to see a really amazing photo of Dylan, check out Theo’s blog about Dylan here. 

So many times before I got to know her, I thought how lucky Emily must be to be Dylan’s partner. As I got to know her better, I realized it wasn’t luck at all, it was because she is completely amazing as well. I got to know Emily more and more working on the Portland Zine Symposium together and I can’t imagine what she has been through or is going through because I saw so much love and support between the two of them. They worked on projects together (like PZS and Sparkplug) and supported each other in a way any of us would be fortunate to have with anyone. Knowing Dylan was an inspiration, but knowing Emily and Dylan and watching them care for each other was also a great personal inspiration to me.

When I talked to Emily on the phone yesterday, I felt helpless because I wish I could somehow make everything better. She is such a wonderful and strong person, I know she will get through this, but please consider buying comics from Sparkplug, contributing to any of the many benefits in Dylan’s honor, or showing her some kind of love.  Alex Wrekk and I were talking about doing a Delivered Dish Certificate for her, I have been thinking of just cooking some food and bringing it to her, and stuff like that.

Even in the midst of Dylan being in the hospital, Emily still helped with PZS. We all felt a gaping hole not having Dylan there this year, as he was in the hospital. We passed around a giant card for people to sign (you can see it in this video: http://youtu.be/dytCOyE3tNA, but let me know if you have a photo of that card), but I didn’t  imagine he would not be there next year. Thinking of the Portland Zine Symposium without Dylan there breaks my heart. Like most things Dylan worked on, he brought so much to it.

As a role model to me, Dylan was hardcore. Dylan got shit done. Dylan was an inspiration to see because he followed through on his ideas with action. Dylan was an inspiration to me because we had so many similar values and passions, he embodied those values and passions through his work, successfully. His work and his life showed me what was possible in helping others, building community and being a good friend. I am passionate about many ideas and projects, I try to act constructively and follow through on those ideas and projects. So often, I feel I see people talking about values and ideas without action to back their words up. Dylan didn’t just talk about comics, he made them. Dylan didn’t just support others’ comics, he published, distributed and taught comics. Dylan was an alternative before there was much of an alternative and he didn’t buy into any ideas about how comics should be, he supported anyone in making comics in their own way. He didn’t view anything as “more legitimate” just because it was mainstream, he truly found value in comics as art and supported artists making what they were inspired to make. Dylan didn’t just show compassion, he was kind to people he didn’t even agree with, something I struggle to do in my own life and often fall short on. Knowing and talking to Dylan about such conflicts has helped me improve on that and I can try to continue improving on remembering how he approached those he didn’t agree with. Even when he saw people in the Portland comics scene abandoning more independent, community-driven roots, he was thinking about starting a new independent fest. He could have just complained, but he was starting to think of new ideas to grow something instead. Dylan built community, attending zine and comics fests across the nation, contributing to other’s zines and more. When I started Stumptown Underground, his support meant so much to me. Then, when he contributed, despite all the other shit he was working on, I felt like I must be doing something worthwhile.

I also volunteer at IPRC, where Dylan taught as well. I watching him treat his students with such encouragement and dignity. His teaching philosophies were so spot on and it was reflected in I saw his students’ work grow while working with him. Always bringing people together, he would get on them to submit to Stumptown Underground or table at PZS, too.

And, you know, that’s the thing about Dylan. He could make you feel special, he could make you laugh, he could put things in perspective with no bullshit, he could give support in a way that made you feel like what you were doing mattered. Why? Because it does matter! Dylan was genuine and it mattered to him in a real way.

Humbly, without ego and without selfish ploys for credit, Dylan pushed forward ideas, compassion, support and projects for the sake of doing it, because he believed that was the way to be.

And, damn, is he right. Reading posts by others who knew him, it all shines through. It is only sad to lose Dylan because knowing him was such joy and inspiration. That his life was cut short is only a loss because he gave so much.


I could go on and on, but I am still processing. One of the ways I deal with pain is through creative expression. I want to thank everyone who has written about Dylan so far (I have already personally emailed some, I imagine I will have more people to thank soon). All your positive and loving stories are amazing to read and it makes me want to figure out a way to preserve a lot of this for each other, for those who may not have known Dylan as well, or for those who will never get the chance to know him in person.

I have started sending out emails about doing a zine dedicated to / in remembrance of Dylan. I am not sure what direction it will take, but maybe it will just be really loose, anything people who have known him would like to contribute, stories about him, his ideas, his work, etc. I would like help putting it together and help giving the whole idea shape. I think I would like to make it something widely available for free, leaving it in comic book stores around Portland and taking it to conventions, etc. Or maybe continually printing and supplying the to Sparkplug and letting Sparkplug sell it? I am not sure. One of the many values Dylan and I shared was a passion for collective, equal organizing. I would love the organizational help in an equal way from anyone who is interested. If you want to help me organize it or just to contribute, please email me at lovemotionstory [at] gmail [dot] com, I would love to hear from anyone who knew Dylan about this. I also am thinking about starting another independent comics fest in his honor, as we’ve seen more indie comics people coming to PZS looking for a place to express their voice.

Thank you for everything, Dylan Williams. You lead your life in such a kind, sincere and active way. We are all so lucky to know you.


Here are other posts about Dylan that specifically meant a lot to me:

Alex Wrekk – http://alexwrekk.wordpress.com/2011/09/13/1576/
Tom Neely – http://www.facebook.com/iwilldestroyyou/posts/10150296855268051 – “he was better than all of us. and he only wanted us to be ourselves. that’s all i can say right now.”
Tessa Brunton – http://tessab.net/2011/09/11/in-peace/
Gabby Playhouse – http://www.gabbysplayhouse.com/?p=1934
Austin English – http://dominobooksnews.com/2011/09/11/
Elijah Brubaker – http://elijahbrubaker.com/?p=1311
David King – http://www.reliablecomics.com/2011/09/dylan-williams/
2D Cloud – http://2dcloud.blogspot.com/2011/09/dylan-william-publisher-at-sparkplug.html
Katy Ellis O’Brien – http://blog.trumpetflower.net/?p=725
If you are interested in reading more about Dylan and all the wonderful things people have to say about his life, you can check out The Comics Reporter page of the collective memory of Dylan Williams: http://www.comicsreporter.com/index.php/collective_memory_dylan_williams_rip/

Written by lovemotionstory

September 12, 2011 at 8:06 pm

I’m a zine hustler…

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Making the Portland Zine Symposium update yesterday, reminded me to update my blog. Then I quickly realized I am majorly lacking on updating my blog again. Oh, sigh.

I better use this opportunity to announce that I organizing and doing the 3rd Annual PZS 24hr Zine Challenge this year. I would encourage most any zinester/comicker to try a 24hr project at some point in their creative life. It’s really exciting, scary and fulfilling. Even if you don’t finish (I didn’t the first year), you inevitably learn a lot. If you’re not up to the challenge, please consider sponsoring me (I only have one sponsor, but that jerk Alex Wrekk has, like, a million). Speaking of which, my one sponsor is the ever-awesome Neil Brideau. He is a friend of mine that lives in Chicago, makes awesome comics, and helped start / organizes the Chicago Zine Fest.

If you sponsor me for $10 or more, you get a free copy of the zine (but you only pay if I finish) and PZS gets a donation, so everybody wins. So far, the 24hr Zine I made last year is the only zine of only my work I have ever made, so this will, hopefully, be the second.

I am not sure where to begin. My life is totally swamped with PZS, I am super behind on Stumptown Underground‘s summer issue organizing. I am asking the others for help, but Katie A. is in the same boat as me, Katy O’Brien is in Sweden being an au pair for the summer, Kirsten is still in Korea, Jon just got a job (congratulations, dude), and hopskotch is just always busy. Oh, by the way, did you know Stumptown Underground is a collective and we’re open to new members? Because, yeah, we could sure use some more, dedicated hands.

Oh, also, the deadline to submit to Stumptown Underground ocean issue is July 23rd. If you submitted to the summer issue, you should her from us soon!

ocean issue, zine submissions call

I will make a more personal update soon, I swear…