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Another Crazy 24 Hours…

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So, the last two years, I have actually finished the 24hr Zine Challenge (it was HARD) and I am organizing yet another with Portland Zine Symposium. When we started this event and then I had the rad idea to turn it into a fundraiser, I had no idea how helpful a fundraising event it would be!

So, here’s the deal… If you sponsor me for $10 or more, you only pay if I finish. All the money goes to PZS. I donate a copy of the zine and get it to you.

Here I am at the end of the 24hr Zine Challenge last year with my finished zine, “24 Hours of My Innermost Fears.”

24hoursofmyinnermostfears

That one was crazy. I wanted to do a mini zine to give myself a lighter challenge in terms of the amount of content I needed to get together because I was also organizing (like every year), but then I ended up going way past 24 pages.

This year, I will have to take a 4 hour break from the challenge to go to the rock camp showcase (because I am volunteering to be a band manager for the second week of Rock’N’Roll Camp for Girls, yay!), so I think I might also do small zine. But, as per the rules of the challenge, I won’t be making in concept plans or anything else before the big day. Which is July 27th!

Sponsor me? You’ll get a copy of my zine while also donating at least ten bucks to the Portland Zine Symposium. In fact, if you sign up to sponsor me for at least $15 and I do complete the challenge, I will give you a copy this year’s 24hr zine and a copy of last years. And this, I promise you, if the only way you will get a copy otherwise for at least another year.

And maybe you want to sign up and do it too?

Yeah, I certainly would encourage you too. It’s a great challenge even if you don’t finish (I didn’t the first two years). If you DO finish though, you’ve got an awesome new zine to hand out jut in time for PZS!

Also, check out this cool drawing Matt made for me about 24hr zine making because he’s a supportive  partner and awesome and draws things for me sometimes!!!!

24hzrCHbyMJRainwater

 

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Written by lovemotionstory

July 19, 2013 at 4:42 pm

On Oppression, Intersectionality, and Solidarity

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I wanted to share this comic that I saw thanks to my friend Chelsea.

 

Word! I love that this was this person’s final project, the comic highlights a common misogyny in nerd culture and it is so bravely personal. Total respect for the feminism here, this person showing their own struggle and being vulnerable, while recognizing another perspective for women in nerd culture who is also struggling even though they might conform to narrow guidelines of beauty-based-on-size.

If you relate to being left out by the rampant sexism in comics and nerd culture, if you relate to being belittled, objectified, harassed, etc. based on your gender despite thinking that nerd space should be a safe space… Well, you might also want to check out this amazing article by super intelligent nerd, Rachel Ediden. http://feminspire.com/idiot-nerd-girl-has-a-posse-taking-back-the-meme/

Speaking of super intelligent nerds, I went to the really awesome panel “Looking Past the Target Audience” at SCF this past weekend, but missed it at ECCC. It was really great to listen to the conversation with Rachel EdidinAndy KhouriFaith Erin HicksScotty IseriSfé M., and David Walker sitting on the panel. There was a lot on intersectionality, which was crucial! Intersectionality is a concept often used to describe the ways in which oppressive institutions (racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, xenophobia, classism, etc.) are INTERCONNECTED and cannot be examined separately from one another. Third Wave Feminism, especially, thrived on the concept of intersectionality in order to redefine Feminism as inclusive. The concept of intersectionality first came from legal scholar Kimberle Crenshaw in 1989 and is largely used in critical theories, especially Feminist theory, when discussing systematic oppression.

If you missed it or if you want to be having these kinds of discussions, I would recommend checking out their tumblr (thatonepanel.tumblr.com).

For me, one of the most moving moments of the panel was when Sfé was talking about how an aspect of their process for creating Kyle & Atticus was to write a gender queer character with positive support and acceptance in their life. I think it really hit home for me because a lot of the stuff Matt, Marco, and I have been dealing with Matt’s parents understanding what our polyamorous relationship means and learning that I am a queer atheist. Essentially, he’s been coming out to them and it’s been really hard. That in addition to struggles I have always had with people being unsupportive toward me. This struggle, having parents, acquaintances, lovers, and even a long-time best-friend have acted as if they are shamed by me or have been demeaning or hateful toward me for any of the various reasons people have antagonistic or problematic relationships with me. That I am a woman, that I am queer, that I am polyamorous, that I  am or do all these things that they can’t relate to, that I fall under any of the labels in their mind that they view as “bad” and then I go on to dare to have opinions, ideas, boundaries, and confidence to be myself. I am motivated to work with kids exactly because I want to try to be that influence in their life, to be the person who says, “You have a voice and it’s important.” Or, “I accept who you are and I will treat you as a person with their own autonomy and agency.” To be a supportive adult. To be an educator that empowers kids to think for themselves and to be themselves. I write about my experiences in the hopes that I can grow and that I might provide support to peers who can see themselves in me because I realize the positive impact that people have had in my life by being themselves and being open about it, as I have written about a few times on this blog. I really respected that Sfé talked about writing supportive roles in the comics on purpose, because I agree with her that creating those characters in stories feeds into the mothers and friends and parents and whoever seeing themselves in the life of a gender queer person or other underrepresented, marginalized people in our society. We really need those role models.

I also want to give huge props to the panel “The Big Picture,” where a bit of gender and intersectionality issues were discussed kind of inadvertently, with Alison Baker, Kelly Sue DeConick, Jen Vaughn, Shannon Watters, and Emi Lenox. As well as the focus of the panel, discussing how the internet has changed comics, especially independent publishing as, to my knowledge, most of the panelists had roots in indie comics and zines.

Personally, I believe that one of the biggest steps in activism is showing up, being visible.

If you have the ability and patience just to be there, that is a huge step.

Do what you can, REALIZE WHAT YOU CAN DO.

Do say hello to the creators and organizations you do want to support. Do buy zines and comics or whatever from the creators you think deserve it for whatever reason you value them. Do go to the panels that talk about issues you care about. Do say thank you (in person or online) to the panelists, we can’t hear it enough. Do blog/tweet/whatever about it. Do talk to your friends about the creations and panels you do enjoy or support. Do volunteer for an organization you think serves a valuable role in your community. Do go to an event that highlights creators and issues that you feel are important or meaningful. Do start your own event, especially if it’s an event you wish existed but doesn’t. Do make your own stories and creative work that reflects your experience, your passion, your values, your ideas. Do listen to or support the people who have different experiences than yourself.

I long lost the patience to volunteer for SCF, but I try to keep showing up to support the people who I do see promoting real conversations and ethical work I commend those who love comics and other cismale/white dominated communities. I have been able to devote myself to working on the Portland Zine Symposium as an organizer for so many years because it strives and works hard to be a safe space, an inclusive community with anti-oppressive ethics.

Also, I want to take this opportunity to promote the Women of Color Zine Symposium at PSU happening this summer, on June 8th. This is such an important event to support to me. It was started by Tonya Jones, a long-time Portland Zine Symposium attendee, powerful writer, and zine educator. The WOC Zine group that she started has self-published three issues of “Women of Color: How to Live in the City of Roses and Avoid the Pricks.” All three issues are available for $3 from the group, Powell’s Bookstore, and In Other Words. The zines can also be checked out from the Multnomah County Library!

And, speaking of the “Women of Color: How to Live in the City of Roses and Avoid the Pricks” zine, they have a submissions call up right now for their fifth issue! The fifth issue is themed for interviews and it’s an opportunity to interview a fantastic woman of color/person of color that you know doing great work in Portland and contribute to a great project. You can read more on their websitehttp://wocpdxzines.wordpress.com/woc-zine-collective-submissions.

If there is a theme to this post, it is that, whatever your battle in coping with oppression, you are not alone.

Keep showing up and we’ll find each other at all the nerd cons and wherever.

IPRC Zine Machine – Submissions Call and Layout Guides!

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Well, I breifly mentioned this project in my post about The new, bigger IPRC, but here are finally the full details!

Introducing the IPRC‘s wonderful, new Zine Machine! 

Justin Hocking, the Independent Publishing Resource Center‘s Executive Director, picked up this old machine at a local hardware store five years ago… It had a few hiccups, but, with the help of a friend, Justin has gotten this thing running smoothly and it’s just been sitting in his garage waiting for the IPRC to have enough space to house it!

Well, not only do we have enough space in the new IPRC location, we also have a wide open sidewalk with a surprising amount of foot traffic…. We plan to wheel this awesome machine out to the sidewalk while we’re open so that IPRC visitors and neighborhood pedestrians alike can plug in their quarters and pick up a fresh mini zine for just one dollar! 

So now, we just need some great mini zines to stock this ol’ machine! We’re doing an open call for submissions to the Zine Machine. The machine has eleven slots for eleven different zines at any given time and we plan to rotate the selection. If your submitted zine makes it in, the IPRC will print 50 copies of  your zine and box, 25 to be stocked into the machine and 25 for you to give to your friends, sell at Portland Zine Symposium, or whatever!

There are also four spaces to feature four boxes, so part of submitting your mini zine can also be making an eye-catching design for the outside of the box. In fact, you can start on this handy-dandy template I’ve made for the IPRC’s Zine Machine Boxes!

Click on the image to see the full size….

But that’s not all the help we’re giving you!

I did some of the math for you already on what kind of a zine might fit into a box like this and also created a layout guide.

This layout guide is for a single-sheet, mini zine that is 32 pages. A zine with pages this size will definitely fit into your awesomely designed box!

This template prints out on a 8.5″ by 11″ (or letter-sized) paper and is just one idea for a layout for a mini zine layout to fit into a box for the IPRC Zine Machine.

I spent way too much time making these guides, just for the record, but I had a ton of fun doing it and I felt it was important to make sure you feel empowered to create, make, and submit your mini zine! Keep this in mind and please feel free to email me with any questions on creation and submitting. Submissions can be emailed to me at lovemotionstory  at gmail dot com or dropped off at the IPRC for me, 1001 SE Division St. Portland, OR.

I am planning on making a couple more layout guides for mini zines over the next couple weeks, but I would encourage you to play around with a sheet of paper and dream up any new layouts!

There is no deadline for your mini zine submissions, as the Zine Machine will be an ongoing project with a rotating stock.  Personally, I would recommend submitting ASAP so that your zine can be one of the first we have in stock! Also, I would love to see the at least one new zine in there a month! In addition to your zine going into your box, a little zine about the IPRC will be in there too, so that others may learn of the wonders of the IPRC.

Also, if you come across any other old cigarette vending machines or any other old vending machines for cheap or free, the IPRC would love to have them! We could repurpose all kinds of machines, from old candy vending machines to tampon vending machines! We’re hoping to approach local businesses to host more Zine Machines all around Portland.

Written by lovemotionstory

April 24, 2012 at 4:28 pm

The new, bigger IPRC…

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I volunteer to be on staff every Monday at the Independent Publishing Resource Center. If you ever have stopped by on a Monday anytime the last little while, I have probably given you a tour, tried to explain something about InDesign to you, helped you figure out why the copy machine wasn’t printing your zine as you imagine, or whatever. The IPRC has been looking for a bigger location for quite awhile, but a much bigger and interesting place was finally found last year and we spent most March and the beginning of April begging the big move across the river.

That’s me, volunteering real hard, followed by Michael, of Perfect Day Publishing, who also volunteers real hard on Mondays.

I came in last week to help try to unpack, build shelves, clean, setup supplies, shelve zines, etc. The IPRC had a soft opening last week, and things are looking good over here. For so long, we’ve had so many more zines for the zine library than we had shelves. In the new space, we have new new shelves up that are empty! With room in the library to expand, to add even more shelf space! I am excited to watch our backlog of donated zines slowly fill up the library… Our gigantic library (which anyone can borrow from for free, by the way), is fully searchable! Check out the online catalog of all the IPRC’s zines here.

We also have more room in the letterpress area (which allows us to carry new typefaces that were donated to our collection!), we’re are adding a screenprinting studio to our repertoire of available DIY experiences, we have more room for workshops and the certificates programs, and A LOT more…

Today marks my first regular Monday volunteering in our brand new space and, after feeling so inspired helping out last week, I came in early to snap some photos to help give you an idea of how wonderful the new space is and how much the IPRC is really being able to add and incorporate…

Definitely check this machine out which, has been just sitting in Justin’s garage for almost five years, just waiting for us to have more space and to be turned into a Zine Machine!

I am going to be helping IPRC solicit submissions for mini zines to into this wonderful thing and curating it’s selection, but more on that later…

Also, the cheery on the top of the new IPRC’s location, the rooftop! Check out my new favorite place to get elevated.

So, yeah, that’s just a quick update sharing the new IPRC! In case you were too lazy to click the links to the IPRC’s website, the new location is at 1001 SE Division St. #2… Which is kind of rad for a vegan lady like me, because Los Gorditos and Portobello are not even two blocks away!

And, speaking of cool non profits, ADX is also in the neighborhood. Is close-in, SE Portland the new DIY district? Could be…

Official Deadline and Update on the DW Remembrance Zine

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Official Deadline & Update on the DW Remembrance Zine
Originally, Tim Goodyear and I talked and started sharing a deadling for the zine that would be the beginning of the year. I have been approached by a lot of people about feeling vulnerable about what to do though they want to do *something* for the zine.
I feel I should share that I feel the same way. I hardly know where to begin with my own submission and I often have feelings about whatever I make being good enough for honoring a person so important to me. When people have come by to say hi to me at IPRC and ask about this, my response is something like this, “Thank you for confiding in me how you feel, I know it’s hard. You may be surprised to know that I am struggling with that myself. Ultimately, you have my love and support whether or not you submit to the zine, though I hope you do. If you need more encouragement, just ask yourself what would Dylan say? Because, I am betting, he’d encourage you to make something. That was one of the great things about him, he always encouraged us to make stuff.” I thought I should include this in the announcement for those having those feelings who have not come by the IPRC to talk about it.
I want to thank a couple of people who sent submissions already, like Chelsea Baker, Julia Gfrörer, and Chris Cilla.
Anyways, the extended and official deadline that we are finally announcing for contributing to this zine is March 31st.
We’re going to be doing a classic, half-sized zine. So, contributions should fit into a 5″x8″ are relatively easily. It’s better to be bigger rather than smaller. Also, remember to be sure that you’re image files are at least 300dpi.
If you are submitting a written piece, I would love to have something more than a raw text file, something that is laid at as uniquely you and stands out as your voice in contrast with the rest of the zine.
Don’t be hesitant to ask me for help if you need it. If you need help scanning, editing, laying out or anything, please let me know. I volunteer at the IPRC and it’s easy to arrange a time for me to help get your finalized submission to me.
At this point, we’re not set on any particular cover, we will consider any illustration submitted as a possible cover (we have also thought about a solid black cover), so the art call for a cover is open to see what we get and how that turns out!
As for thematic guidelines, we feel that it’s best to keep them looser than not. Anything about Dylan, related to Dylan, or about any of Dylan’s many interests will be considered for this zine, reviewed and edited by Tim Goodyear, Tom Neely, and myself (And maybe you? Just ask!) who have offered to help us collectively organize this zine.
As a reminder, all proceeds of the sales of this zine will go to the Dylan Williams Scholarship Fund for the IPRC’s Comics Certificate Program. If you have any other questions or want to help in any other way, please let me know! If I missed something that you’ve asked about, just remind me by asking again, it’s no bother.
Please email me regarding any of this or to contribute. lovemotionstory [at] gmail [dot] com

Written by lovemotionstory

February 1, 2012 at 12:27 pm

Short Run Recap, a Seattle vegan dinner, Memory zine

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I tabled at the first-ever Short Run Small Press Fest in Seattle this past weekend for Stumptown Underground! The Short Run Small Press Fest reminded us a lot of the Portland Zine Symposium in feel, ethics and organization.

Short Run was held at The Vera Project, an all ages, non profit, music and art venue in Seattle Center. We want to give a big thank you to all the organizers who worked hard to keep tabling costs low and admission to the event free, key ingredients to any independently minded festival (as a PZS organizer, I can attest to this)!

I  rode up to Seattle with Emily and Virginia Paine of Sparkplug and tabled for Stumptown Underground, sharing a table with Alex Wrekk.

I met so many people, got a lot of Stumptown Underground zines and information passed out, and had a lot of fun. There were many people checking out Short Run that hadn’t even heard of zines, so it was great to be reaching out to so many new people about independent media. When I talked to organizer Kelly Froh at the end of the day, she said that their count for attendance was 820!

Thank you so much, Short Run! We will want to go again next year, so keep up the good work.

After Short Run, quite a few people hit up Georgetown Liquor Company for food before the after party at Fantagraphics. And, holy moly, did they have some amazing vegan food there! Emily, Virgnia and I shared the arugula artichoke dip, which was blended artichoke hearts and arugula (and, I swear, at least one jalapeno, there was a hint of spiciness) with Daiya mozzarella on top. I had the split pea soup and the Picard, which was made with apple-sage Field Roast, roasted red onions, Daiya mozzarella, Tofutti cream cheese and roasted garlic spread, toasted on ciabatta and served with vegan au jus dipping sauce.  It was all amazing!

I also got a couple records at Georgetown Records, the record store that’s nestled with the Fantagraphics store, and made

Just as a reminder, the next deadline for Stumptown Underground is coming up, for submissions to our memory-themed, 21st issue. Read the open submissions call here: http://www.stumptownunderground.com/2011/10/issue-21-memory/

Life Eternal

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So, as several of you know, either because I emailed you or talked to you in person or because you saw my last blog post, I am working on a zine in remembrance of and in dedication to Dylan Williams.

At this point, after talking to Emily regarding how to handle distributing the zine (if it should be free, if it should be sold by Sparkplug to help keep it going, etc), I approached Justin at the IPRC about selling this zine to help raise funds for a scholarship that IPRC is just announcing will be offered in Dylan’s memory for the IPRC’s Comics Certificate Program. Dylan taught in the program, teaching and supporting others in their creative endeavors was important to him in many ways, and it seems like the best thing to do with the result of the zine… Especially since Emily suggested it. So, this zine will be sold all over and all proceeds will go to the Dylan Williams Scholarship Fund for the IPRC’s Comics Certificate Program.

I am also thinking of calling the zine Life Eternal, because my favorite photo of Dylan is the one Theo posted of Dylan next to those words. I think Dylan would feel kind of awkward if his face was on the cover of something, as he was rather humble, so I was having the cover all black, those letters in white, and that photo on the inside cover with an explanation of the zine, how it’s in dedication to his life and ideas and what the sales of the zine go to. This is not an idea I am married to and I need to ask Theo about using the photo, but it’s the first idea I had. I would also be open to doing a call for an illustration for the cover.

As far as submissions go, anyone can submit anything related to Dylan Williams, his ideas, his life, and so on. I would like to keep guidelines very loose so as to have the zine be  as inclusive as it can. Writing, illustrations, comics… Pretty much anything printable.

Do you have any thoughts on any of this? To what degree would you like to help? Just contributing? Helping review submissions? Organizing? Just organizing advice? I am open to as little or much involvement from anyone at this point, because I’d like to approach it with an inclusive and cooperative spirit. The zine anthology I work on usually, Stumptown Underground, is a collective I started to publish anthologies where all organizers have equal input and submissions are totally open to anyone, so I guess that’s why I would approach this that way.

Please email me regarding any of this or to contribute.
lovemotionstory [at] gmail [dot] com