A Modern Woman on the Move

in hot pursuit of the great green light…

Archive for the ‘humour’ Category

Days of Love Sale!

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Hey friends! Now that Matt has this new-fangled site, where all his work is collected in one place (designed by Matt and coded by Marco), he has opened up his Etsy store listing prints and offering commissions!!

To celebrate the new site and the love-based-holiday that is Valentine’s Day, he’s having a sale on commissions that’s perfect for fulfilling your need for a card-sized piece of original art, either for a lover, a friend, or yourself!  From now until February 14th, you can enter in the coupon code INFINITYLOVEPIZZA while checking out to get  33% off of your commission order in Matt’s Etsy store!

He’s offering ink drawings or ink drawing that are finished with water colors or digital coloring, so check out his Etsy commissions listings!

And, let me tell you, Matt’s really been cooking up some rad, love-based illustrations recently…

A few months ago, some friends of ours who are in a triad relationship, were celebrating their love and commitment to each other with a formal commitment ceremony (somewhat like a wedding). They are also rather nerdy and passionate about their interests (two of them had been Disney villainesses for Halloween), so many geeky elements were part of their wedding’s decor, including making their vows while wrapping a Tom Baker Doctor Who  scarf around all their hands and having 20-sided die scattered on the tables. Matt made them an appropriately nerdy commitment ceremony gift…. An illustration of Disney villainesses playing D&D together!

DnDisney

For Christmas, he made our wonderful neighbors smaller, original-illustration cards featuring their furry, household loved ones…

Ambrose, the chihuahua…

Ambrose

Porter, the ball-obsessed yellow lab…

Porter

Danielle and Thor, cougar pug princess and her mighty pup companion…

Pugs

Just a couple weeks ago, for a lovely friend’s birthday (Cat Farris), he made an awesome illustration featuring the character of her webcomic, Flaccid Badger, with one of her beloved game characters from Mass Effect, Garrus

GarrusFlacidBadger

So, as you can see, the dude is a talented artist for all your love-capturing needs. He’s having this sale because he really enjoys having new stuff to draw and mash-up. So, whatever ignites the love within you this Valentine’s Day, ask Matt to do a commission to bring your lovely imaginings into reality! Treat yourself or someone else you love. <3

Just visit his commissions listing in his Etsy store, then, during checkout, you can enter in the coupon code INFINITYLOVEPIZZA to get 33$% off of your commission order.

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Written by lovemotionstory

January 27, 2014 at 5:10 pm

On Oppression, Intersectionality, and Solidarity

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I wanted to share this comic that I saw thanks to my friend Chelsea.

 

Word! I love that this was this person’s final project, the comic highlights a common misogyny in nerd culture and it is so bravely personal. Total respect for the feminism here, this person showing their own struggle and being vulnerable, while recognizing another perspective for women in nerd culture who is also struggling even though they might conform to narrow guidelines of beauty-based-on-size.

If you relate to being left out by the rampant sexism in comics and nerd culture, if you relate to being belittled, objectified, harassed, etc. based on your gender despite thinking that nerd space should be a safe space… Well, you might also want to check out this amazing article by super intelligent nerd, Rachel Ediden. http://feminspire.com/idiot-nerd-girl-has-a-posse-taking-back-the-meme/

Speaking of super intelligent nerds, I went to the really awesome panel “Looking Past the Target Audience” at SCF this past weekend, but missed it at ECCC. It was really great to listen to the conversation with Rachel EdidinAndy KhouriFaith Erin HicksScotty IseriSfé M., and David Walker sitting on the panel. There was a lot on intersectionality, which was crucial! Intersectionality is a concept often used to describe the ways in which oppressive institutions (racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, xenophobia, classism, etc.) are INTERCONNECTED and cannot be examined separately from one another. Third Wave Feminism, especially, thrived on the concept of intersectionality in order to redefine Feminism as inclusive. The concept of intersectionality first came from legal scholar Kimberle Crenshaw in 1989 and is largely used in critical theories, especially Feminist theory, when discussing systematic oppression.

If you missed it or if you want to be having these kinds of discussions, I would recommend checking out their tumblr (thatonepanel.tumblr.com).

For me, one of the most moving moments of the panel was when Sfé was talking about how an aspect of their process for creating Kyle & Atticus was to write a gender queer character with positive support and acceptance in their life. I think it really hit home for me because a lot of the stuff Matt, Marco, and I have been dealing with Matt’s parents understanding what our polyamorous relationship means and learning that I am a queer atheist. Essentially, he’s been coming out to them and it’s been really hard. That in addition to struggles I have always had with people being unsupportive toward me. This struggle, having parents, acquaintances, lovers, and even a long-time best-friend have acted as if they are shamed by me or have been demeaning or hateful toward me for any of the various reasons people have antagonistic or problematic relationships with me. That I am a woman, that I am queer, that I am polyamorous, that I  am or do all these things that they can’t relate to, that I fall under any of the labels in their mind that they view as “bad” and then I go on to dare to have opinions, ideas, boundaries, and confidence to be myself. I am motivated to work with kids exactly because I want to try to be that influence in their life, to be the person who says, “You have a voice and it’s important.” Or, “I accept who you are and I will treat you as a person with their own autonomy and agency.” To be a supportive adult. To be an educator that empowers kids to think for themselves and to be themselves. I write about my experiences in the hopes that I can grow and that I might provide support to peers who can see themselves in me because I realize the positive impact that people have had in my life by being themselves and being open about it, as I have written about a few times on this blog. I really respected that Sfé talked about writing supportive roles in the comics on purpose, because I agree with her that creating those characters in stories feeds into the mothers and friends and parents and whoever seeing themselves in the life of a gender queer person or other underrepresented, marginalized people in our society. We really need those role models.

I also want to give huge props to the panel “The Big Picture,” where a bit of gender and intersectionality issues were discussed kind of inadvertently, with Alison Baker, Kelly Sue DeConick, Jen Vaughn, Shannon Watters, and Emi Lenox. As well as the focus of the panel, discussing how the internet has changed comics, especially independent publishing as, to my knowledge, most of the panelists had roots in indie comics and zines.

Personally, I believe that one of the biggest steps in activism is showing up, being visible.

If you have the ability and patience just to be there, that is a huge step.

Do what you can, REALIZE WHAT YOU CAN DO.

Do say hello to the creators and organizations you do want to support. Do buy zines and comics or whatever from the creators you think deserve it for whatever reason you value them. Do go to the panels that talk about issues you care about. Do say thank you (in person or online) to the panelists, we can’t hear it enough. Do blog/tweet/whatever about it. Do talk to your friends about the creations and panels you do enjoy or support. Do volunteer for an organization you think serves a valuable role in your community. Do go to an event that highlights creators and issues that you feel are important or meaningful. Do start your own event, especially if it’s an event you wish existed but doesn’t. Do make your own stories and creative work that reflects your experience, your passion, your values, your ideas. Do listen to or support the people who have different experiences than yourself.

I long lost the patience to volunteer for SCF, but I try to keep showing up to support the people who I do see promoting real conversations and ethical work I commend those who love comics and other cismale/white dominated communities. I have been able to devote myself to working on the Portland Zine Symposium as an organizer for so many years because it strives and works hard to be a safe space, an inclusive community with anti-oppressive ethics.

Also, I want to take this opportunity to promote the Women of Color Zine Symposium at PSU happening this summer, on June 8th. This is such an important event to support to me. It was started by Tonya Jones, a long-time Portland Zine Symposium attendee, powerful writer, and zine educator. The WOC Zine group that she started has self-published three issues of “Women of Color: How to Live in the City of Roses and Avoid the Pricks.” All three issues are available for $3 from the group, Powell’s Bookstore, and In Other Words. The zines can also be checked out from the Multnomah County Library!

And, speaking of the “Women of Color: How to Live in the City of Roses and Avoid the Pricks” zine, they have a submissions call up right now for their fifth issue! The fifth issue is themed for interviews and it’s an opportunity to interview a fantastic woman of color/person of color that you know doing great work in Portland and contribute to a great project. You can read more on their websitehttp://wocpdxzines.wordpress.com/woc-zine-collective-submissions.

If there is a theme to this post, it is that, whatever your battle in coping with oppression, you are not alone.

Keep showing up and we’ll find each other at all the nerd cons and wherever.

This feminist believes people can just be better than that…

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So, recently, my partner Matt’s mom sent him these books….

I jokingly tweeted that Matt and Marco say, “We surrender!” (originally Marco’s joke), and posted this photo. However, it turns out Matt’s mom is reading my blog and internet stuff. And, more recently, Matt got this gem in the mail… tencommandmentsofdating

I am pretty sure Matt, Marco and I have already read aloud to each other more of this book than his mom read before sending it. Just in case, let me reassure you, Matt’s mom, you raised a much better son than what this book would like us to believe…

allmenareconnivinganddeceptive

All men are not conniving and deceptive. Especially not Matt. He is one of the most wonderful, honest and sweet people I know. I love him.

Though he might lick the lint out of Buddha’s belly button to impress a girl, I don’t know.

But, seriously, I don’t think he’d become a Buddhist just to impress a girl. I think Matt is a more defined and self-actualized person than that. I know Matt’s mom is having a hard time understanding polyamory and sexual freedom, but I do appreciate that she loves her son and is reaching out to him.

It can be hard to see people taking a different path than yourself or that deviates from your beliefs, but just because it’s different, doesn’t mean it’s invalid. Just because we have more than one  committed relationship in our lives or that we’re open to, doesn’t mean our love for one another is not deep and meaningful. And, nonconformity can really be a saving grace, especially when popular books in Christian mainstream would encourage you to uphold and conform to certain types of relationships because,  based on your gender, you must be a conniving liar trying to get into any girl’s pants.

Further, I would like to put it out there that, for me, feminism is about understanding that traditional gender roles can hurt men who aren’t interested in those roles, as well as women and especially any other gender expression. Gender binary is harmful, and narrow gender constructs like what the Ten Commandments of Dating try to convince people about each other based on gender are HORRIBLE. Do we really want to tell men that they’re all conniving liars? And, if the authors of the Ten Commandments of Dating are wrong about you’re son, what else are those authors dramatically negative or completely wrong about?

I leave y’all with a few links on those ideas…

http://thefbomb.org/2010/05/how-feminism-helps-everyone-not-just-the-women/ http://goodmenproject.com/featured-content/five-ways-feminism-helps-men/ http://feminspire.com/feminism-its-good-for-men-too/

Written by lovemotionstory

April 16, 2013 at 3:07 pm

“On the radio whoa oh oh”

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Yesterday, Alex Wrekk and I went on The Nerd Report to talk about the Portland Zine Symposium and zines!

The hosts, Emily Gibson and Sabrina Miller, were nice and very funny. Before I do radio interviews (wow, I have done multiple radio interviews, what are these people thinking?), I try to listen to a few episodes of the show asking for an interview to make sure it will be a good/fun/etc. Because of this, I am pretty sure I am going to become a regular, Nerd Report listener, they rule pretty hard. And I already listen to other pdx.fm shows, like Cort and Fatboy.

I love doing interviews because you really have an opportunity to learn more about you already love by being forced to articulate explanations for what you’re so passionate about. Also, doing interviews along side of people who share your passion (i.e. in this case, Alex and I did the interview together), is a great opportunity to discuss together what you love in ways you might not think to normally.

Normally, Alex and I work really hard with the other PZS organizers to pull together the event when we meet to talk about and, if when we meet together just as friends, we may not feel like talking about all things PZS because we want to have friend time together. In an interview, we have the chance to talk about PZS just in general, not for the purposes of planning it, which is really refreshing! Also, it’s fascinating to experience how different interviewers choose to frame their questions. In this interview, we sort of mention that when Emily asks a pretty serious and relevant question in an really intelligent way, despite not knowing a lot about zines. Major props, Emily! It also made me feel pretty great when my slightly inappropriate jokes made Emily laugh so much that she put down her headphones, got up and walked around the room cracking up.

The interview was live yesterday, but you can still listen to it now online, found here: http://nerdreport.pdxaudioarchive.com/nerd_episode044.mp3